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Bring me the horizon most popular song

Bring Me The Horizon are one of the biggest metal bands of the 21 st century. Since forming in the British five-piece have transformed themselves from scrappy deathcore upstarts into a geniune commercial powerhouse with the songs, pulling power and, thanks to frontman Oli Sykes, charisma to top charts and fill arenas around the globe. The punked-up, infectious, snarling chorus is juxtaposed early on by the ethereal choral vocals that float through the whole album, showcasing a different, more harmonious side to the Steel City menaces. That said, the crunching, destructive riffs rid any notion of mainstream radio play as four and a half minutes of metallic fury hurtle past in the blink of an eye. And if you think that might not be for you, just listen to the stadium-sized chorus and watch your bollocks fly into the next post code. Back to the gravel-gargling era of Mr Sykes and co, before the idea of clean vocals had ever been planted in the studio, this is one of the nastiest songs to ever be called catchy. BMTH have always known their way around a tune, but this sits at the other end of the spectrum, so visceral and horrific is the soundscape created that the idea of silence begins to feel like a distant memory. The end is nigh! Historians will one day look back on these seconds as the point the metal game changed. This is the biggest song Bring Me The Horizon have ever written, both in terms of popularity and its ability to fill every corner of a stadium.
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'Don't Go'

Throughout their career, Bring Me the Horizon have continuously expanded their musical boundaries. Over time, frontman Oliver Sykes has added melodic clean vocals to his deep guttural growls. The band has also gradually focused less on the brutality of the breakdown by paying much more attention to song structure and musical composition. With each album, Bring Me the Horizon have taken another giant step forward in their musical legacy. The gripping track is lined with an overwhelming sense of insatiable hunger and desire. Light melodies slowly crescendo into a riveting climax with a steady drum beat in the background, seemingly mimicking a heart beating. On this album, Oliver Sykes blows fans away with an unforgettable vocal delivery. A choir and a string section add a dark ambiance to the sinister message of this tune. The song begins with an electronic intro paired with the drums, which mimic a heart beating. It progresses into a blast of explosive musical phrases from the full band, along with the new synth.

About Billboard

Indeed, to best understand BMTH , this list could be re-ordered chronologically. For fans like ourselves, though, the question remains: which banger goes off harder than the rest? With electronic all-rounder Jordan Fish previously of Worship coming aboard, their definitive line-up was solidified and they began to crank out sounds that would truly change the game. If, on the release of their third album, there were whispers that Bring Me might be selling out and moving on from the unhinged savagery of their past, the four-and-a-half minute assault of Alligator Blood felt like an unhinged riposte. Its spring-loaded central riff taken, apparently, from sessions with Limp Bizkit , lyrical musings on encroaching middle-age, and that guest spot from Cradle Of Filth mainman Dani Filth were the signs of artists growing bored and shifting from their comfort zone. An unforgettable Theo Watkins-directed video only ramped up the self-referential silliness. Can you see the dark? Can you fix the broken? Can you feel, can you feel my heart? Relatively straightforward by their standards, this stretches and swells over its sub-four-minute run, with pulsating, panicked synths dragging themselves to the top of the mix.

Bring Me The Horizon are one of the biggest metal bands of the 21 st century. Since forming in the British five-piece have transformed themselves from scrappy deathcore upstarts into a geniune commercial powerhouse with the songs, pulling power and, thanks to frontman Oli Sykes, charisma to top charts and fill arenas around the globe. The punked-up, infectious, snarling chorus is juxtaposed early on by the ethereal choral vocals that float through the whole album, showcasing a different, more harmonious side to the Steel City menaces.

That said, the crunching, destructive riffs rid any notion of mainstream radio play as four and a half minutes of metallic fury hurtle past in the blink of an eye.

And if you think that might not be for you, just listen to the stadium-sized chorus and watch your bollocks fly into the next post code.

Back to the gravel-gargling era of Mr Sykes and co, before the idea of clean vocals had ever been planted in the studio, this is one of the nastiest songs to ever be called catchy. BMTH have always known their way around a tune, but this sits at the other end of the spectrum, so visceral and horrific is the soundscape created that the idea of silence begins to feel like a distant memory. The end is nigh! Historians will one day look back on these seconds as the point the metal game changed.

This is the biggest song Bring Me The Horizon have ever written, both in terms of popularity and its ability to fill every corner of a stadium. Impossible to ignore and if you can make it all the way through without bouncing off the walls you should probably visit the doctor. Dive-bombing into a hellacious sea of juddering electronics, crashing cymbals and gnarled guitars, Oli sounds his most menacing as he bellows with every ounce of passion and hatred he possesses.

Pray for the dead! Unrelenting, racketing drums back up the distorted metallic riffs and the giant, engulfing layers of vocals that could level buildings. Please deactivate your ad blocker in order to see our subscription offer. See more Metal Hammer features.



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